HEALTH.

Black Seeds: A cure for all disease except death

368views

Black seed, also known as Nigella Sativa and Habbat ul barakah in Arabic countries, that is the Blessed Seed. It’s also called Black Onion Seed by some tribe because of its similarity to onion seed in appearance but they share no relation to each other. Black Seed has been known and used throughout many cultures for over two thousand years.
Aisha (may Allah be pleased with her) said that she heard the Messenger (SAW) say, “This black seed is a cure for every disease except death.” -Saheeh al-Bukharee (5687).
Below are some medical benefits of Black Seed.
Another profound discovery is that the ingredients (Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids) of the oil lead to increased production of the messenger substance Prostaglandin E1, a hormone-like substance, that functions as a general regulator on several body functions such as:

  1. Brain function
  2. Nerve function
  3. Lowering blood pressure
  4. Activation of the immune system.
    Black Seed is Rich in Nutritional Values:
    Monosaccharides (Single Molecule Sugars) in the form of Glucose, Rhamnose, Xylose, and Arabinose are found in the Black Seed.
    The Black Seed contains a non-starch Polysaccharide component which is a useful source of dietary fiber. It is rich in fatty acids, particularly the unsaturated and essential fatty acids (Linoleic and Linoleic Acid). Essential fatty acids cannot be manufactured by the body alone, and therefore we acquire these from food.
    Fifteen amino acids make up the protein content of the Black Seed, including eight of the nine essential amino acids. Essential amino acids cannot be synthesized within our body in sufficient quantities and are thus required from our diet.
    Black Seed contains Arginine which is essential for infant growth: Chemical analysis has further revealed that the Black Seed contains Carotene, which is converted by the liver into Vitamin A, the Vitamin known for its Anti-Cancer activity.
    The Black Seed is also a source of Calcium, Iron, Sodium, and Potassium. Required only in small amounts by the body, these elements’ main function is to act as essential co-factors in various enzyme functions.
    Immune System Strengthening: Studies begun just over a decade ago suggest that if used on an ongoing basis, Black Seed can play an important role to enhance human immunity, particularly in immunocompromise patients.
    Anti-Histamine Activity: Histamine is a substance released by bodily tissues, sometimes creating allergic reactions and is associated with conditions such as Bronchial Asthma.
    In 1960, scientists Badr-El-Din and Mahfouz found that dimer dithymoquinone isolated from Black Seed’s volatile oil, under the name of “Nigellone,” and given by mouth to some patients suffering from Bronchial Asthma, suppressed the symptoms of the condition in the majority of patients.
    Following the results of this early study, Crystalline Nigellone was administered to children and adults in the treatment of Bronchial Asthma with effective results and no sign of toxicity. It was observed, however, that although effective, Crystalline Nigellone displayed a delayed reaction.
    Anti-tumor Principles: A study of Black Seed’s potential anti-tumor principles by the Amala Research Center in Amala Nagar, Kerala (India) in 1991 lent further impetus to Dr. Chakravarty’s suggestion for the possible use of Black Seed in the treatment of Cancer.
    Using an active principle of fatty acids derived from Black Seed, studies with Swiss Albino Mice showed that this active principle could completely inhibit the development of a common type of cancer cells called Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC). A second common type of cancer cells, Dalton’s lymphoma ascites (DLA) cells were also used. Mice which had received the EAC cells and Black Seed remained normal without any tumor formation, illustrating that the active principle was 100% effective in preventing EAC tumor development.
    Results in mice who received DLA cells and Black Seed showed that the active principle had inhibited tumor development by 50% less compared to mice not given the active principle.
    The study concluded, “It is evident that the active principle isolated from Nigella Sativa Seeds is a potent anti-tumor agent, and the constituent long chain fatty acid may be the main active component.”
    Anti-Bacterial: In 1989, a report appeared in the Pakistan Journal of Pharmacy about Anti-Fungal Properties of the volatile oil of Black Seed. 1992 saw researchers at the Department of Pharmacy, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, conducting a study in which the antibacterial activity of the volatile oil of Black Seed was compared with five antibiotics: Ampicillin, Tetracycline, Cotrimoxazole, Gentamicin, and Nalidixic Acid.
    The Black Seed Oil proved to be more effective against many strains of bacteria, including those known to be highly resistant to drugs: V. Cholera, E. Coli (a common infectious agent found in undercooked meats), and all strains of Shigella spp., except Shigella Dysentriae. Most strains of Shigella have been shown to rapidly become resistant to commonly used antibiotics and chemotheraputic agents.
    In light of the above research findings, it is of interest that homeopaths have long been known to make a tincture from the Black Seed for digestive and bowel complaints. Traditionally, the Black Seed is still used to help relieve vomiting and diarrhea, as well as flatulent colic, and to help counteract the griping action of purgatives (e.g. certain laxatives, fruits such as apricots when over consumed).
    Anti-Inflammatory: As early as 1960, Professor El-Dakhakny reported that Black Seed Oil has an anti-inflammatory effect and that it could be useful for relieving the effects of Arthritis.
    The inhibition of Eicasanoid generation, however, was higher than could be expected from Thymoquinone alone. Their study suggested that other compounds within the oil might also be responsible for the enhanced anti-inflammatory reactions in cells.
    The scientists speculated that the unusual C20:2 unsaturated fatty acids contained in Black Seed were possibly responsible for boosting the oil’s effectiveness.
    In 1997, studies conducted at the Microbiological Unit of the Research Center, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, found that externally in an ointment form, the anti-inflammatory activity of the Black Seed was found to be in the same range as that of other similar commercial products. The tests also demonstrated that the Black Seed is non-allergenic.
    Promotes Lactation: A study by Agarwhal (1979) showed that Black Seed Oil increases the milk output of breastfeeding mothers. A literature search by the University of Potchefstroom (1989), including biological abstracts, revealed that Black Seed’s capacity to increase the milk flow of nursing mothers could be attributed to a combination of lipid portion and hormonal structures found in the Black Seed.

Leave a Response